Monday, February 9, 2015

This Week's DVD Releases

Click on title to see the film’s trailer

Force Majeure ***½ Directed by Ruben Ostland. At a ski resort in the Alps, the sudden and terrifying approach of an avalanche opens a deep fissure in the lives of a vacationing Swedish family when the patriarch flees to save himself instead of protecting his wife and children. A cruelly precise, often bleakly comic account of upper-middle-class privilege coming unglued when the cosmos throws a curveball.

Stray Dogs ***½ Directed by Tsai Ming Liang. Follows the odyssey of a father and his two children living on the fringes of Taipei, offering glimpses into their past and a vision of a brighter future. The director’s austere minimalism has always been suspended between the mesmerizing and the distancing, and in his latest feature, the concentration on elliptical observation, mood and texture signals an almost complete rejection of narrative.

Nightcrawler *** Directed by Dan Gilroy. Eager for any work that will make ends meet, Lou Bloom (Jake Gyllenhaal) joins the flock of camera crews prowling the nighttime streets of Los Angeles in search of scandal and crime. Despite a mesmerizing performance by Gyllenhaal — he’s as transfixing as a cobra in a snake charmer’s dance — and a terrific turn by Riz Ahmed as an unskilled homeless kid Lou hires as his assistant, Nightcrawler doesn’t quite have the satirical smarts that made Network a classic.

Predestination *** Directed by The Spierig Brothers. Ethan Hawke, Sarah Snook, Noah Taylor. Dispatched on a mission intended to alter the fabric of history, a temporal agent from a remote reality travels through time to prevent a criminal madman from carrying out a devastating attack on New York City. Succeeds in teasing the brain and touching the heart even when its twists and turns keep multiplying well past the point of narrative sustainability.

Kink *** Directed by Christina Voros. A documentary on fetish website Kink.com. Quite convincing in presenting this one workplace as a happy, sane environment where people respect each other and aren’t manipulated into doing things they don’t ultimately enjoy. But it leaves plenty of room to presume that Kink.com is an outlier in the industry.

Rosewater **½ Directed by Jon Stewart. Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari (Gael Garcia Bernal) is detained by Iranian forces who brutally interrogate him under suspicion that he is a spy. For better or worse, torture-themed films don’t get too much easier to take than this one.

Laggies **½ Directed by Lynn Shelton. Keira Knightley, Chloë Grace Moretz, Sam Rockwall. In the throes of a quarter-life crisis, Megan panics when her boyfriend proposes, then, taking an opportunity to escape for a week, hides out in the home of her new friend, 16-year-old Annika, who lives with her world-weary single dad. Possesses irrepressible cheer, optimism and an innate sense of ease that often go missing in angstier productions loosely organized under "Aging, fear of." Unlike its sometimes annoyingly wishy-washy heroine, this is a movie that knows just where it’s going, and finds joy in the journey.

Lilting **½ Directed by Hong Khaou. In contemporary London, a Cambodian Chinese mother mourns the untimely death of her son. The film is awfully methodical, almost mathematical, in working through the various emotional steps every character must take in reaching an end point we readily guess. You appreciate the effort, even as you sense it.

Kill the Messenger **½ Directed by Michael Cuesta. Jeremy Renner, Rosemarie DeWitt, Ray Liotta, Tim Blake Nelson, Barry Pepper, Oliver Platt, Michael Sheen, Michael K. Williams, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Andy Garcia. A reporter becomes the target of a vicious smear campaign that drives him to the point of suicide after he exposes the CIA’s role in arming Contra rebels in Nicaragua and importing cocaine into California. This isn’t a great movie, but it’s a great vehicle for Renner, and a showcase for the kind of work he should be doing more regularly.

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day ** Directed by Miguel Arteta. Steve Carell, Jennifer Garner. When 11-year-old Alexander wakes up with gum stuck in his hair, he’s unaware that it’s only the start of a daylong ordeal of woes. The latest example of a wonderful children’s book turned into a mediocre movie.

Felony ** Directed by Matthew Saville. Three detectives become embroiled in a tense struggle after a tragic accident that leaves a child in a coma. Proves only that skilled actors and slick photography can tart up even the most problematic script.

The Song Directed by Richard Ramsey. An aspiring singer-songwriter’s life and marriage suffer when the song he writes for his wife propels him to stardom. Striking nary an unfamiliar note, The Song sluggishly lurches towards its predictable conclusion — spoiler alert, the hero sees the error of his ways — but it does offer a few pleasures along the way.

Poker Night Directed by Greg Francis. Beau Mirchoff, Titus Welliver, Michael Eklund, Ron Eldard, Corey Large, Giancarlo Esposito, Ron Perlman. A young detective becomes an unwilling participant in a sadistic game of cat-and-mouse when he is kidnapped by a masked serial killer. Francis has a few moments of inspiration, nonchalantly deploying visual gags. If he were going for cult status, perhaps gonzo is the way to go. The rest of his stylistic flaunts, plot twists and contrivances are joyless.

Addicted * Directed by Bille Woodruff. A gallerist risks her family and flourishing career when she enters into an affair with a talented painter and slowly loses control of her life. Doesn’t know whether it wants to be a modern-day bodice-ripper, a morality-tinged cautionary tale or a serious snapshot of sexual compulsion. Whatever the case, it fails on all fronts.

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